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Gerontology

Associate Degrees

A.A. in Gerontology: Administrative

This degree provides a broad overview of the biological, psychological, and social aspects of adult development and aging as a foundation for a gerontological biopsychosocial perspective. Additional business, gerontology, and math courses are included to provide an administrative focus. This program is intended for students who plan to seek employment upon completion of the degree or as preparation for further gerontology/social services studies at a four-year college or university.

This degree is nationally accredited by Accreditation for Gerontology in Higher Education (AGEC) and it is recognized as a Program of Merit by the Academy for Gerontology in Higher Education (AGHE), which sets the standards for gerontological curriculum. Program graduates receive additional certificates from AGEC and AGHE.

Catalog Date: June 1, 2021

Degree Requirements

Course Code Course Title Units
GERON 302 Psychology of Aging: Adult Development and Aging (3) 3
   or PSYC 374 Psychology of Aging: Adult Development and Aging (3)
GERON 303 Introduction to Social Gerontology: Aging in Contemporary Society 3
GERON 304 Ethical Issues and Client's Rights (3) 3
   or HSER 310 Ethical Issues and Client's Rights (3)
GERON 335 Wellness for Older Adults 3
GERON 490 Aging Policy and Practice 3
HSER 300 Introduction to Human Services 3
HSER 330 Issues of Diverse Populations (3) 3
   or PSYC 365 Issues of Diverse Populations (3)
   or SPEECH 325 Intercultural Communication (3)
SPEECH 321 Interpersonal Communication (3) 3
A minimum of 3 units from the following: 3
GERON 498 Work Experience in Gerontology (0.5 - 4)
A minimum of 9 units from the following: 9
BUS 100 English for the Professional (3)
MATH 300 Introduction to Mathematical Ideas (3)
   or BUS 105 Business Mathematics (3)
BUS 350 Small Business Management/Entrepreneurship (3)
   or BUS 300 Introduction to Business (3)
   or GERON 220 RCFE Administrator Training (4.5)
Total Units: 36

The Gerontology: Administrative Associate in Arts (A.A.) degree may be obtained by completion of the required program, plus general education requirements, plus sufficient electives to meet a 60-unit total. See ARC graduation requirements.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this program, the student will be able to:

  • associate social conditions in the current and recent past with their potential impact on future aging cohorts.
  • evaluate the impact of diversity in terms of race, ethnicity, religion, sex, gender and sexual orientation, and citizenship on well-being during aging and on aging outcomes.
  • generalize knowledge about cognition and memory during aging to how people learn and remember at any age.
  • recognize macro, mezzo, and micro level ageism messages that marginalize and stigmatize older people.
  • enumerate the functions of social service delivery systems.
  • synthesize knowledge of existing California professional codes of ethics for the helping professions.
  • analyze legal and ethical issues related to aging including the mandatory reporting of abuse, neglect, and exploitation, value imposition, and end-of-life decisions.
  • demonstrate ease, confidence, rapport, and listening skills during interactions with older adults at various levels of function.
  • differentiate between aging-related changes and the effects of social condition and deprivations, and physical and mental diseases, disorders, deficits, injuries, and disabilities.
  • assess the impacts of lifestyle choices on the biopsychosocial domains of function during aging.
  • apply biopsychosocial gerontological knowledge to case studies and real-life situations.
  • list services for seniors and adults with disabilities available within a community.
  • compose sentences and paragraphs in business documents with proper structure, word usage and spelling, punctuation and proof reading, and critical thinking.
  • demonstrate accuracy, neatness, thoroughness, and speed adding, subtracting, multiplying and dividing whole numbers, fractions and decimals, solving written application problems, using formulas, variables and equations, and creating and interpreting graphs.
  • describe the key management functions of planning, organizing, leading, and controlling including ethical, regulatory/legal, social, and cultural factors.

Career Information

Entry-level administrative positions in state and local government agencies, non-profit organizations, institutions, and private sector businesses that provide older people and adults with disabilities with information and referral service, service coordination, employment and legal services, activity and recreation programs, health education and health promotion programs, housing, medical care, and in-home support services.


A.A. in Gerontology: Advocacy and Social Policy

This degree provides a broad overview of the biological, psychological, and social aspects of adult development and aging as a foundation for a gerontological biopsychosocial perspective. Additional political science, sociology, and speech courses are included to provide an advocacy and social policy focus. This program is intended for students who plan to seek employment upon completion of the degree or as preparation for further gerontology/social services studies at a four-year college or university.

This degree is nationally accredited by Accreditation for Gerontology in Higher Education (AGEC) and it is recognized as a Program of Merit by the Academy for Gerontology in Higher Education (AGHE), which sets the standards for gerontological curriculum. Program graduates receive additional certificates from AGEC and AGHE.

Catalog Date: June 1, 2021

Degree Requirements

Course Code Course Title Units
GERON 302 Psychology of Aging: Adult Development and Aging (3) 3
   or PSYC 374 Psychology of Aging: Adult Development and Aging (3)
GERON 303 Introduction to Social Gerontology: Aging in Contemporary Society 3
GERON 304 Ethical Issues and Client's Rights (3) 3
   or HSER 310 Ethical Issues and Client's Rights (3)
GERON 335 Wellness for Older Adults 3
GERON 490 Aging Policy and Practice 3
HSER 300 Introduction to Human Services 3
HSER 330 Issues of Diverse Populations (3) 3
   or PSYC 365 Issues of Diverse Populations (3)
   or SPEECH 325 Intercultural Communication (3)
SPEECH 321 Interpersonal Communication 3
A minimum of 3 units from the following: 3
GERON 498 Work Experience in Gerontology (0.5 - 4)
A minimum of 9 units from the following: 9
POLS 330 Constitutional Rights (3)
   or POLS 304 Introduction to Government: California (3)
   or POLS 301 Introduction to Government: United States (3)
SOC 300 Introductory Sociology (3)
   or SJS 300 Introduction to Social Justice Studies (3)
SPEECH 301 Public Speaking (3)
   or SPEECH 311 Argumentation and Debate (3)
   or SPEECH 302 Persuasive Speech (3)
Total Units: 36

The Gerontology: Advocacy and Social Policy Associate in Arts (A.A.) degree may be obtained by completion of the required program, plus general education requirements, plus sufficient electives to meet a 60-unit total. See ARC graduation requirements.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this program, the student will be able to:

  • associate social conditions in the current and recent past with their potential impact on future aging cohorts.
  • evaluate the impact of diversity in terms of race, ethnicity, religion, sex, gender and sexual orientation, and citizenship on well-being during aging and on aging outcomes.
  • generalize knowledge about cognition and memory during aging to how people learn and remember at any age.
  • recognize macro, mezzo, and micro level ageism messages that marginalize and stigmatize older people.
  • enumerate the functions of social service delivery systems.
  • synthesize knowledge of existing California professional codes of ethics for the helping professions.
  • analyze legal and ethical issues related to aging including the mandatory reporting of abuse, neglect, and exploitation, value imposition, and end-of-life decisions.
  • demonstrate ease, confidence, rapport, and listening skills during interactions with older adults at various levels of function.
  • differentiate between aging-related changes and the effects of social condition and deprivations, and physical and mental diseases, disorders, deficits, injuries, and disabilities.
  • assess the impacts of lifestyle choices on the biopsychosocial domains of function during aging.
  • apply biopsychosocial gerontological knowledge to case studies and real-life situations.
  • list services for seniors and adults with disabilities available within a community.
  • recognize the relationship between constitutional rights, the governing process, and public policy at both the state and federal level.
  • assess the relationships between individual social and cultural backgrounds to everyday life events, social conditions, and quality of life.
  • apply logic and evidence to support, organize, and deliver persuasive discourse.

Career Information

Entry-level advocacy and support positions in state and local government agencies, non-profit organizations, institutions, and private sector businesses that provide older people and adults with disabilities with information and referral service, service coordination, employment and legal services, activity and recreation programs, health education and health promotion programs, housing, medical care, and in-home support services.


A.A. in Gerontology: Case Management and Social Services

This degree provides a broad overview of the biological, psychological, and social aspects of adult development and aging as a foundation for a gerontological biopsychosocial perspective. Additional human services and psychology courses are included to provide a case management and social services focus. This program is intended for students who plan to seek employment upon completion of the degree or as preparation for further gerontology/social services studies at a four-year college or university.

This degree is nationally accredited by Accreditation for Gerontology in Higher Education (AGEC) and it is recognized as a Program of Merit by the Academy for Gerontology in Higher Education (AGHE), which sets the standards for gerontological curriculum. Program graduates receive additional certificates from AGEC and AGHE.

Catalog Date: June 1, 2021

Degree Requirements

Course Code Course Title Units
GERON 302 Psychology of Aging: Adult Development and Aging (3) 3
   or PSYC 374 Psychology of Aging: Adult Development and Aging (3)
GERON 303 Introduction to Social Gerontology: Aging in Contemporary Society 3
GERON 304 Ethical Issues and Client's Rights (3) 3
   or HSER 310 Ethical Issues and Client's Rights (3)
GERON 335 Wellness for Older Adults 3
GERON 490 Aging Policy and Practice 3
HSER 300 Introduction to Human Services 3
HSER 330 Issues of Diverse Populations (3) 3
   or PSYC 365 Issues of Diverse Populations (3)
   or SPEECH 325 Intercultural Communication (3)
SPEECH 321 Interpersonal Communication 3
A minimum of 3 units from the following: 3
GERON 498 Work Experience in Gerontology (0.5 - 4)
A minimum of 9 units from the following: 9
PSYC 400 Introduction to Chemical Dependency (3)
   or HSER 340 Introduction to Chemical Dependency (3)
HSER 365 Techniques of Group Counseling (3)
   or HSER 360 Techniques of Interviewing and Counseling (3)
PSYC 390 Psychology of Death and Dying (3)
Total Units: 36

The Gerontology: Case Management and Social Services Associate in Arts (A.A.) degree may be obtained by completion of the required program, plus general education requirements, plus sufficient electives to meet a 60-unit total. See ARC graduation requirements.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this program, the student will be able to:

  • associate social conditions in the current and recent past with their potential impact on future aging cohorts.
  • evaluate the impact of diversity in terms of race, ethnicity, religion, sex, gender and sexual orientation, and citizenship on well-being during aging and on aging outcomes.
  • generalize knowledge about cognition and memory during aging to how people learn and remember at any age.
  • recognize macro, mezzo, and micro level ageism messages that marginalize and stigmatize older people.
  • enumerate the functions of social service delivery systems.
  • synthesize knowledge of existing California professional codes of ethics for the helping professions.
  • analyze legal and ethical issues related to aging including the mandatory reporting of abuse, neglect, and exploitation, value imposition, and end-of-life decisions.
  • demonstrate ease, confidence, rapport, and listening skills during interactions with older adults at various levels of function.
  • differentiate between aging-related changes and the effects of social condition and deprivations, and physical and mental diseases, disorders, deficits, injuries, and disabilities.
  • assess the impacts of lifestyle choices on the biopsychosocial domains of function during aging.
  • apply biopsychosocial gerontological knowledge to case studies and real-life situations.
  • list services for seniors and adults with disabilities available within a community.
  • assess the psychological, physiological, and sociocultural issues related to substance use, misuse, and abuse.
  • demonstrate the techniques of interviewing and counseling individuals or groups appropriate for associate level helpers in social service agency settings.
  • describe the psychological, social, philosophical, and legal issues related to death.

Career Information

Entry-level care management and social services positions in state and local government agencies, non-profit organizations, institutions, and private sector businesses that provide older people and adults with disabilities with information and referral service, service coordination, employment and legal services, activity and recreation programs, health education and health promotion programs, housing, medical care, and in-home support services. Graduates with this focus may also become self-employed.


A.A. in Gerontology: Health Care

This degree provides a broad overview of the biological, psychological, and social aspects of aging, along with introductory course work emphasizing the health needs of an aging population. It focuses on preparation for entry-level positions with private industry, government, and non-profit agencies providing health services to senior adults and/or preparation for further gerontology/health care study at a four-year college or university.

Catalog Date: June 1, 2021

Degree Requirements

Course Code Course Title Units
GERON 302 Psychology of Aging: Adult Development and Aging (3) 3
   or PSYC 374 Psychology of Aging: Adult Development and Aging (3)
GERON 303 Introduction to Social Gerontology: Aging in Contemporary Society 3
GERON 304 Ethical Issues and Client's Rights (3) 3
   or HSER 310 Ethical Issues and Client's Rights (3)
GERON 335 Wellness for Older Adults 3
GERON 490 Aging Policy and Practice 3
HSER 300 Introduction to Human Services 3
HSER 330 Issues of Diverse Populations (3) 3
   or PSYC 365 Issues of Diverse Populations (3)
   or SPEECH 325 Intercultural Communication (3)
SPEECH 321 Interpersonal Communication 3
A minimum of 3 units from the following: 3
GERON 498 Work Experience in Gerontology (0.5 - 4)
A minimum of 9 units from the following: 9
AH 311 Medical Language for Health-Care Providers (3)
BIOL 300 The Foundations of Biology (3)
   or BIOL 102 Essentials of Human Anatomy and Physiology (4)
   or NURSE 100 Nurse Assistant (7)
SLPA 300 Introduction to Communication Disorders (3)
Total Units: 36

The Gerontology: Health Care Associate in Arts (A.A.) degree may be obtained by completion of the required program, plus general education requirements, plus sufficient electives to meet a 60-unit total. See ARC graduation requirements.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this program, the student will be able to:

  • associate social conditions in the current and recent past with their potential impact on future aging cohorts.
  • evaluate the impact of diversity in terms of race, ethnicity, religion, sex, gender and sexual orientation, and citizenship on well-being during aging and on aging outcomes.
  • generalize knowledge about cognition and memory during aging to how people learn and remember at any age.
  • recognize macro, mezzo, and micro level ageism messages that marginalize and stigmatize older people.
  • enumerate the functions of social service delivery systems.
  • synthesize knowledge of existing California professional codes of ethics for the helping professions.
  • analyze legal and ethical issues related to aging including the mandatory reporting of abuse, neglect, and exploitation, value imposition, and end-of-life decisions.
  • demonstrate ease, confidence, rapport, and listening skills during interactions with older adults at various levels of function.
  • differentiate between aging-related changes and the effects of social condition and deprivations, and physical and mental diseases, disorders, deficits, injuries, and disabilities.
  • assess the impacts of lifestyle choices on the biopsychosocial domains of function during aging.
  • apply biopsychosocial gerontological knowledge to case studies and real-life situations.
  • list services for seniors and adults with disabilities available within a community.
  • demonstrate a workable knowledge of medical terminology by interpreting health care reports/records accurately into clear, non-medical terms.
  • differentiate between the basic mechanisms of biological homeostasis and aging from physiological imbalances related to illness and disease.
  • identify communication disorders in individuals of various ages with consideration of cultural and linguistic differences.

Career Information

Entry-level positions with private industry, government, and non-profit agencies providing health services to senior adults


A.A. in Gerontology: Recreation

This degree provides a broad overview of the biological, psychological, and social aspects of adult development and aging as a foundation for a gerontological biopsychosocial perspective. Additional gerontology, kinesiology, and recreation courses are included to provide a recreation focus. This program is intended for students who plan to seek employment upon completion of the degree or as preparation for further gerontology/social services studies at a four-year college or university.

This degree is nationally accredited by Accreditation for Gerontology in Higher Education (AGEC) and it is recognized as a Program of Merit by the Academy for Gerontology in Higher Education (AGHE), which sets the standards for gerontological curriculum. Program graduates receive additional certificates from AGEC and AGHE.

Catalog Date: June 1, 2021

Degree Requirements

Course Code Course Title Units
GERON 302 Psychology of Aging: Adult Development and Aging (3) 3
   or PSYC 374 Psychology of Aging: Adult Development and Aging (3)
GERON 303 Introduction to Social Gerontology: Aging in Contemporary Society 3
GERON 304 Ethical Issues and Client's Rights (3) 3
   or HSER 310 Ethical Issues and Client's Rights (3)
GERON 335 Wellness for Older Adults 3
GERON 490 Aging Policy and Practice 3
HSER 300 Introduction to Human Services 3
HSER 330 Issues of Diverse Populations (3) 3
   or PSYC 365 Issues of Diverse Populations (3)
   or SPEECH 325 Intercultural Communication (3)
SPEECH 321 Interpersonal Communication 3
A minimum of 3 units from the following: 3
GERON 498 Work Experience in Gerontology (0.5 - 4)
A minimum of 9 units from the following: 9
GERON 200 Activity Leader, Coordinator, and Director Training (3)
KINES 407 Techniques of Group Fitness Instruction (2)
   or KINES 405 Effects of Exercise on Special Populations (2)
RECR 320 Recreation Activity Leadership (3)
   or RECR 300 Introduction to Recreation and Leisure Services (3)
Total Units: 36

The Gerontology: Recreation Associate in Arts (A.A.) degree may be obtained by completion of the required program, plus general education requirements, plus sufficient electives to meet a 60-unit total. See ARC graduation requirements.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this program, the student will be able to:

  • associate social conditions in the current and recent past with their potential impact on future aging cohorts.
  • evaluate the impact of diversity in terms of race, ethnicity, religion, sex, gender and sexual orientation, and citizenship on well-being during aging and on aging outcomes.
  • generalize knowledge about cognition and memory during aging to how people learn and remember at any age.
  • recognize macro, mezzo, and micro level ageism messages that marginalize and stigmatize older people.
  • enumerate the functions of social service delivery systems.
  • synthesize knowledge of existing California professional codes of ethics for the helping professions.
  • analyze legal and ethical issues related to aging including the mandatory reporting of abuse, neglect, and exploitation, value imposition, and end-of-life decisions.
  • demonstrate ease, confidence, rapport, and listening skills during interactions with older adults at various levels of function.
  • differentiate between aging-related changes and the effects of social condition and deprivations, and physical and mental diseases, disorders, deficits, injuries, and disabilities.
  • assess the impacts of lifestyle choices on the biopsychosocial domains of function during aging.
  • apply biopsychosocial gerontological knowledge to case studies and real-life situations.
  • list services for seniors and adults with disabilities available within a community.
  • develop an activity calendar and newsletter that meets the overall needs of residents in a facility or community.
  • integrate health and aging-related fitness components into fitness activities relevant to a group setting.
  • list recreation and leisure events for a diverse population based on health and age.

Career Information

Entry-level positions planning and leading recreation and leisure activities in skilled nursing facilities, adult day health centers, residential care facilities for the elderly, memory care units, adult day programs, and other settings that provide care, services, and housing for older people and adults with disabilities.


A.A. in Gerontology

The coursework provides a foundation in the biopsychosocial discipline of gerontology, including social gerontology, the psychology of aging, the aging process, and the social determinants of health and aging outcomes. Intended for students who plan to transfer and complete a bachelors degree.

Catalog Date: June 1, 2021

Degree Requirements

Course Code Course Title Units
BIOL 300 The Foundations of Biology (3) 3 - 4
   or BIOL 310 General Biology (4)
GERON 302 Psychology of Aging: Adult Development and Aging (3) 3
   or PSYC 374 Psychology of Aging: Adult Development and Aging (3)
GERON 303 Introduction to Social Gerontology: Aging in Contemporary Society 3
POLS 301 Introduction to Government: United States (3) 3
   or POLS 481 Introduction to Government: United States - Honors (3)
STAT 300 Introduction to Probability and Statistics (4) 4
   or STAT 480 Introduction to Probability and Statistics - Honors (4)
A minimum of 3 units from the following: 3
NUTRI 300 Nutrition (3)
PSYC 480 Honors General Principles (3)
   or PSYC 300 General Principles (3)
PSYC 354 The Psychology of Family Life and Intimate Relationships in a Diverse Society (3)
PSYC 370 Human Development: A Life Span (3)
Total Units: 19 - 20

The Gerontology Associate in Arts (A.A.) degree may be obtained by completion of 60 transferable, semester units, including (a) the major or area of emphasis described in the Required Program, and (b) one of the following: the ARC General Education, the Intersegmental General Education Transfer Curriculum (IGETC), or the California State University General Education-Breadth Requirements.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this program, the student will be able to:

  • explain basic genetics and cellular, anatomical, and physiological mechanisms by which humans maintain homeostasis.
  • assess how race, gender, and ethnicity influence an individual’s ability to optimize aging and how they think, feel, and experience the aging process.
  • synthesize psychological, psychosocial, and social theories used to predict how an individual might respond to the aging process or to old age.
  • appraise the influence of historical events, technological advancements, cultural shifts, and social policies on aging cohorts based on decade of birth.
  • relate the importance of social programs, family, friends, and other supports during aging.
  • enumerate the function of the constitution, federal and state government, and public policies and programs at all levels of government.
  • explain the civil liberties and civil rights of individuals as articulated in the United States Constitution and federal court decisions.
  • distinguish between methods of obtaining data, types of data, and types of analysis and the advantages and disadvantages of the methods, data types, and analysis.
  • analyze data by computing measures of central tendency, measures of dispersion, and measures of position.
  • develop a broader understanding about aging through the lens of a behavioral or health science.

Career Information

Completion of this degree and bachelor's degree in a related field prepares students to work in local government agencies, non-profit organizations, institutions, and private sector businesses that provide information services, employment and legal services, activity and recreation programs, health education and health promotion programs, housing, and care and support services for older people.

Certificates of Achievement

Gerontology: Administrative Certificate

This program provides a broad overview of the biological, psychological, and social aspects of adult development and aging as a foundation for a gerontological biopsychosocial perspective. Additional business, gerontology, and math courses are included to provide an administrative focus. This program is intended for students who plan to seek employment upon completion of the program.

This program is recognized as a Program of Merit by the Academy for Gerontology in Higher Education (AGHE), which sets the standards for gerontological curriculum. Program graduates receive an additional certificate from AGHE.

Catalog Date: June 1, 2021

Certificate Requirements

Course Code Course Title Units
GERON 302 Psychology of Aging: Adult Development and Aging (3) 3
   or PSYC 374 Psychology of Aging: Adult Development and Aging (3)
GERON 303 Introduction to Social Gerontology: Aging in Contemporary Society 3
GERON 304 Ethical Issues and Client's Rights (3) 3
   or HSER 310 Ethical Issues and Client's Rights (3)
GERON 335 Wellness for Older Adults 3
GERON 490 Aging Policy and Practice 3
HSER 300 Introduction to Human Services 3
HSER 330 Issues of Diverse Populations (3) 3
   or PSYC 365 Issues of Diverse Populations (3)
   or SPEECH 325 Intercultural Communication (3)
SPEECH 321 Interpersonal Communication 3
A minimum of 3 units from the following: 3
GERON 498 Work Experience in Gerontology (0.5 - 4)
A minimum of 9 units from the following: 9
BUS 100 English for the Professional (3)
MATH 300 Introduction to Mathematical Ideas (3)
   or BUS 105 Business Mathematics (3)
BUS 350 Small Business Management/Entrepreneurship (3)
   or BUS 300 Introduction to Business (3)
   or GERON 220 RCFE Administrator Training (4.5)
Total Units: 36

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this program, the student will be able to:

  • associate social conditions in the current and recent past with their potential impact on future aging cohorts.
  • evaluate the impact of diversity in terms of race, ethnicity, religion, sex, gender and sexual orientation, and citizenship on well-being during aging and on aging outcomes.
  • generalize knowledge about cognition and memory during aging to how people learn and remember at any age.
  • recognize macro, mezzo, and micro level ageism messages that marginalize and stigmatize older people.
  • enumerate the functions of social service delivery systems.
  • synthesize knowledge of existing California professional codes of ethics for the helping professions.
  • analyze legal and ethical issues related to aging including the mandatory reporting of abuse, neglect, and exploitation, value imposition, and end-of-life decisions.
  • demonstrate ease, confidence, rapport, and listening skills during interactions with older adults at various levels of function.
  • differentiate between aging-related changes and the effects of social condition and deprivations, and physical and mental diseases, disorders, deficits, injuries, and disabilities.
  • assess the impacts of lifestyle choices on the biopsychosocial domains of function during aging.
  • apply biopsychosocial gerontological knowledge to case studies and real-life situations.
  • list services for seniors and adults with disabilities available within a community.
  • compose sentences and paragraphs in business documents with proper structure, word usage and spelling, punctuation and proof reading, and critical thinking.
  • demonstrate accuracy, neatness, thoroughness, and speed adding, subtracting, multiplying and dividing whole numbers, fractions and decimals, solving written application problems, using formulas, variables and equations, and creating and interpreting graphs.
  • describe the key management functions of planning, organizing, leading, and controlling including ethical, regulatory/legal, social, and cultural factors.

Career Information

Entry-level administrative positions in state and local government agencies, non-profit organizations, institutions, and private sector businesses that provide older people and adults with disabilities with information and referral service, service coordination, employment and legal services, activity and recreation programs, health education and health promotion programs, housing, medical care, and in-home support services.


Gerontology: Advocacy and Social Policy Certificate

This program provides a broad overview of the biological, psychological, and social aspects of adult development and aging as a foundation for a gerontological biopsychosocial perspective. Additional political science, sociology, and speech courses are included to provide an advocacy and social policy focus. This program is intended for students who plan to seek employment upon completion of the degree.

This program is recognized as a Program of Merit by the Academy for Gerontology in Higher Education (AGHE), which sets the standards for gerontological curriculum. Program graduates receive an additional certificate from AGHE.

Catalog Date: June 1, 2021

Certificate Requirements

Course Code Course Title Units
GERON 302 Psychology of Aging: Adult Development and Aging (3) 3
   or PSYC 374 Psychology of Aging: Adult Development and Aging (3)
GERON 303 Introduction to Social Gerontology: Aging in Contemporary Society 3
GERON 304 Ethical Issues and Client's Rights (3) 3
   or HSER 310 Ethical Issues and Client's Rights (3)
GERON 335 Wellness for Older Adults 3
GERON 490 Aging Policy and Practice 3
HSER 300 Introduction to Human Services 3
HSER 330 Issues of Diverse Populations (3) 3
   or PSYC 365 Issues of Diverse Populations (3)
   or SPEECH 325 Intercultural Communication (3)
SPEECH 321 Interpersonal Communication 3
A minimum of 3 units from the following: 3
GERON 498 Work Experience in Gerontology (0.5 - 4)
A minimum of 9 units from the following: 9
POLS 330 Constitutional Rights (3)
   or POLS 301 Introduction to Government: United States (3)
   or POLS 302 Comparative Politics (3)
SOC 480 Introductory Sociology - Honors (3)
   or SOC 300 Introductory Sociology (3)
   or SJS 300 Introduction to Social Justice Studies (3)
SPEECH 301 Public Speaking (3)
   or SPEECH 311 Argumentation and Debate (3)
   or SPEECH 302 Persuasive Speech (3)
Total Units: 36

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this program, the student will be able to:

  • associate social conditions in the current and recent past with their potential impact on future aging cohorts.
  • evaluate the impact of diversity in terms of race, ethnicity, religion, sex, gender and sexual orientation, and citizenship on well-being during aging and on aging outcomes.
  • generalize knowledge about cognition and memory during aging to how people learn and remember at any age.
  • recognize macro, mezzo, and micro level ageism messages that marginalize and stigmatize older people.
  • enumerate the functions of social service delivery systems.
  • synthesize knowledge of existing California professional codes of ethics for the helping professions.
  • analyze legal and ethical issues related to aging including the mandatory reporting of abuse, neglect, and exploitation, value imposition, and end-of-life decisions.
  • demonstrate ease, confidence, rapport, and listening skills during interactions with older adults at various levels of function.
  • differentiate between aging-related changes and the effects of social condition and deprivations, and physical and mental diseases, disorders, deficits, injuries, and disabilities.
  • assess the impacts of lifestyle choices on the biopsychosocial domains of function during aging.
  • apply biopsychosocial gerontological knowledge to case studies and real-life situations.
  • list services for seniors and adults with disabilities available within a community.
  • recognize the relationship between constitutional rights, the governing process, and public policy at both the state and federal level.
  • assess the relationships between individual social and cultural backgrounds to everyday life events, social conditions, and quality of life.
  • apply logic and evidence to support, organize, and deliver persuasive discourse.

Career Information

Entry-level advocacy and support positions in state and local government agencies, non-profit organizations, institutions, and private sector businesses that provide older people and adults with disabilities with information and referral service, service coordination, employment and legal services, activity and recreation programs, health education and health promotion programs, housing, medical care, and in-home support services.


Gerontology: Case Management and Social Services Certificate

This degree provides a broad overview of the biological, psychological, and social aspects of adult development and aging as a foundation for a gerontological biopsychosocial perspective. Additional human services and psychology courses are included to provide a case management and social services focus. This program is intended for students who plan to seek employment upon completion of the degree.

This certificate is recognized as a Program of Merit by the Academy for Gerontology in Higher Education (AGHE), which sets the standards for gerontological curriculum. Program graduates receive an additional certificate from AGHE.

Catalog Date: June 1, 2021

Certificate Requirements

Course Code Course Title Units
GERON 302 Psychology of Aging: Adult Development and Aging (3) 3
   or PSYC 374 Psychology of Aging: Adult Development and Aging (3)
GERON 303 Introduction to Social Gerontology: Aging in Contemporary Society 3
GERON 304 Ethical Issues and Client's Rights (3) 3
   or HSER 310 Ethical Issues and Client's Rights (3)
GERON 335 Wellness for Older Adults 3
GERON 490 Aging Policy and Practice 3
HSER 300 Introduction to Human Services 3
HSER 330 Issues of Diverse Populations (3) 3
   or PSYC 365 Issues of Diverse Populations (3)
   or SPEECH 325 Intercultural Communication (3)
SPEECH 321 Interpersonal Communication 3
A minimum of 3 units from the following: 3
GERON 498 Work Experience in Gerontology (0.5 - 4)
A minimum of 9 units from the following: 9
PSYC 400 Introduction to Chemical Dependency (3)
   or HSER 340 Introduction to Chemical Dependency (3)
HSER 365 Techniques of Group Counseling (3)
   or HSER 360 Techniques of Interviewing and Counseling (3)
PSYC 390 Psychology of Death and Dying (3)
Total Units: 36

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this program, the student will be able to:

  • associate social conditions in the current and recent past with their potential impact on future aging cohorts.
  • evaluate the impact of diversity in terms of race, ethnicity, religion, sex, gender and sexual orientation, and citizenship on well-being during aging and on aging outcomes.
  • generalize knowledge about cognition and memory during aging to how people learn and remember at any age.
  • recognize macro, mezzo, and micro level ageism messages that marginalize and stigmatize older people.
  • enumerate the functions of social service delivery systems.
  • synthesize knowledge of existing California professional codes of ethics for the helping professions.
  • analyze legal and ethical issues related to aging including the mandatory reporting of abuse, neglect, and exploitation, value imposition, and end-of-life decisions.
  • demonstrate ease, confidence, rapport, and listening skills during interactions with older adults at various levels of function.
  • differentiate between aging-related changes and the effects of social condition and deprivations, and physical and mental diseases, disorders, deficits, injuries, and disabilities.
  • assess the impacts of lifestyle choices on the biopsychosocial domains of function during aging.
  • apply biopsychosocial gerontological knowledge to case studies and real-life situations.
  • list services for seniors and adults with disabilities available within a community.
  • assess the psychological, physiological, and sociocultural issues related to substance use, misuse, and abuse.
  • demonstrate the techniques of interviewing and counseling individuals or groups appropriate for associate level helpers in social service agency settings.
  • describe the psychological, social, philosophical, and legal issues related to death.

Career Information

Entry-level care management and social services positions in state and local government agencies, non-profit organizations, institutions, and private sector businesses that provide older people and adults with disabilities with information and referral service, service coordination, employment and legal services, activity and recreation programs, health education and health promotion programs, housing, medical care, and in-home support services. Graduates with this focus may also become self-employed.


Gerontology: Health Care Certificate

This degree provides a broad overview of the biological, psychological, and social aspects of adult development and aging as a foundation for a gerontological biopsychosocial perspective. Additional Allied Health, biology, psychology, speech pathology, and nursing courses are included to provide an administrative focus. This program is intended for students who plan to seek employment upon completion of the degree or as preparation for further gerontology/social services studies at a four-year college or university.

This degree is nationally accredited by Accreditation for Gerontology in Higher Education (AGEC) and it is recognized as a Program of Merit by the Academy for Gerontology in Higher Education (AGHE), which sets the standards for gerontological curriculum. Program graduates receive additional certificates from AGEC and AGHE.

Catalog Date: June 1, 2021

Certificate Requirements

Course Code Course Title Units
GERON 302 Psychology of Aging: Adult Development and Aging (3) 3
   or PSYC 374 Psychology of Aging: Adult Development and Aging (3)
GERON 303 Introduction to Social Gerontology: Aging in Contemporary Society 3
GERON 304 Ethical Issues and Client's Rights (3) 3
   or HSER 310 Ethical Issues and Client's Rights (3)
GERON 335 Wellness for Older Adults 3
GERON 490 Aging Policy and Practice 3
HSER 300 Introduction to Human Services 3
HSER 330 Issues of Diverse Populations (3) 3
   or PSYC 365 Issues of Diverse Populations (3)
   or SPEECH 325 Intercultural Communication (3)
SPEECH 321 Interpersonal Communication 3
A minimum of 3 units from the following: 3
GERON 498 Work Experience in Gerontology (0.5 - 4)
A minimum of 9 units from the following: 9
AH 311 Medical Language for Health-Care Providers (3)
BIOL 300 The Foundations of Biology (3)
   or BIOL 102 Essentials of Human Anatomy and Physiology (4)
   or NURSE 100 Nurse Assistant (7)
SLPA 300 Introduction to Communication Disorders (3)
Total Units: 36

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this program, the student will be able to:

  • associate social conditions in the current and recent past with their potential impact on future aging cohorts.
  • evaluate the impact of diversity in terms of race, ethnicity, religion, sex, gender and sexual orientation, and citizenship on well-being during aging and on aging outcomes.
  • generalize knowledge about cognition and memory during aging to how people learn and remember at any age.
  • recognize macro, mezzo, and micro level ageism messages that marginalize and stigmatize older people.
  • enumerate the functions of social service delivery systems.
  • synthesize knowledge of existing California professional codes of ethics for the helping professions.
  • analyze legal and ethical issues related to aging including the mandatory reporting of abuse, neglect, and exploitation, value imposition, and end-of-life decisions.
  • demonstrate ease, confidence, rapport, and listening skills during interactions with older adults at various levels of function.
  • differentiate between aging-related changes and the effects of social condition and deprivations, and physical and mental diseases, disorders, deficits, injuries, and disabilities.
  • assess the impacts of lifestyle choices on the biopsychosocial domains of function during aging.
  • apply biopsychosocial gerontological knowledge to case studies and real-life situations.
  • list services for seniors and adults with disabilities available within a community.
  • demonstrate a workable knowledge of medical terminology by interpreting health care reports/records accurately into clear, non-medical terms.
  • differentiate between the basic mechanisms of biological homeostasis and aging from physiological imbalances related to illness and disease.
  • identify communication disorders in individuals of various ages with consideration of cultural and linguistic differences.

Career Information

Entry-level care and support service positions in private residences, skilled nursing facilities, adult day health centers, residential care facilities for the elderly, memory care units, adult day programs, and other settings that provide care and services for older people and adults with disabilities.


Gerontology: Recreation Certificate

This program provides a broad overview of the biological, psychological, and social aspects of adult development and aging as a foundation for a gerontological biopsychosocial perspective. Additional gerontology, kinesiology, and recreation courses are included to provide a recreation focus. This program is intended for students who plan to seek employment upon completion of the program.

This program is recognized as a Program of Merit by the Academy for Gerontology in Higher Education (AGHE), which sets the standards for gerontological curriculum. Program graduates receive an additional certificate from AGHE.

Catalog Date: June 1, 2021

Certificate Requirements

Course Code Course Title Units
GERON 302 Psychology of Aging: Adult Development and Aging (3) 3
   or PSYC 374 Psychology of Aging: Adult Development and Aging (3)
GERON 303 Introduction to Social Gerontology: Aging in Contemporary Society 3
GERON 304 Ethical Issues and Client's Rights (3) 3
   or HSER 310 Ethical Issues and Client's Rights (3)
GERON 335 Wellness for Older Adults 3
GERON 490 Aging Policy and Practice 3
HSER 300 Introduction to Human Services 3
HSER 330 Issues of Diverse Populations (3) 3
   or PSYC 365 Issues of Diverse Populations (3)
   or SPEECH 325 Intercultural Communication (3)
SPEECH 321 Interpersonal Communication 3
A minimum of 3 units from the following: 3
GERON 498 Work Experience in Gerontology (0.5 - 4)
A minimum of 9 units from the following: 9
KINES 407 Techniques of Group Fitness Instruction (2)
   or KINES 405 Effects of Exercise on Special Populations (2)
RECR 320 Recreation Activity Leadership (3)
   or RECR 300 Introduction to Recreation and Leisure Services (3)
Total Units: 36

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this program, the student will be able to:

  • associate social conditions in the current and recent past with their potential impact on future aging cohorts.
  • evaluate the impact of diversity in terms of race, ethnicity, religion, sex, gender and sexual orientation, and citizenship on well-being during aging and on aging outcomes.
  • generalize knowledge about cognition and memory during aging to how people learn and remember at any age.
  • recognize macro, mezzo, and micro level ageism messages that marginalize and stigmatize older people.
  • enumerate the functions of social service delivery systems.
  • synthesize knowledge of existing California professional codes of ethics for the helping professions.
  • analyze legal and ethical issues related to aging including the mandatory reporting of abuse, neglect, and exploitation, value imposition, and end-of-life decisions.
  • demonstrate ease, confidence, rapport, and listening skills during interactions with older adults at various levels of function.
  • differentiate between aging-related changes and the effects of social condition and deprivations, and physical and mental diseases, disorders, deficits, injuries, and disabilities.
  • assess the impacts of lifestyle choices on the biopsychosocial domains of function during aging.
  • apply biopsychosocial gerontological knowledge to case studies and real-life situations.
  • list services for seniors and adults with disabilities available within a community.
  • develop an activity calendar and newsletter that meets the overall needs of residents in a facility or community.
  • integrate health and aging-related fitness components into fitness activities relevant to a group setting.
  • list recreation and leisure events for a diverse population based on health and age.

Career Information

Entry-level positions planning and leading recreation and leisure activities in skilled nursing facilities, adult day health centers, residential care facilities for the elderly, memory care units, adult day programs, and other settings that provide care, services, and housing for older people and adults with disabilities.


Senior Fitness Specialist Certificate

The Senior Fitness Specialist program prepares students for employment as a fitness leader in settings where people ages 50+ exercise with other age groups and in settings that cater to older adults. The program provides students with the knowledge and hands on experience necessary to begin a career in this growing field of fitness.

Catalog Date: June 1, 2021

Certificate Requirements

Course Code Course Title Units
FITNS 351 Exercise, Balance and Mobility 1
GERON 205 Validation: Theory and Practice 0.5
GERON 230 Motivating Older Adults to Stay Active 0.5
GERON 335 Wellness for Older Adults 3
GERON 378 Body Mechanics and Safety 0.5
GERON 380 Nutrition and Aging 0.5
HEED 310 Community CPR and Adult AED 1
KINES 403 Fitness and Exercise Assessment 2
KINES 405 Effects of Exercise on Special Populations 2
KINES 406 Techniques of Strength Training Instruction 2
KINES 407 Techniques of Group Fitness Instruction 2
A minimum of 1 unit from the following: 11
WEXP 498 Work Experience in (Subject) (1 - 4)
Total Units: 16

1One unit of work experience is required in one of the following environments: recreation center, senior center, senior community, assisted living facility, or another site for seniors.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this program, the student will be able to:

  • recommend beneficial exercises for seniors and individuals with disabilities or medical conditions.
  • behave responsibly at work, exhibiting initiative and self-management in situations where it is needed.
  • create an individualized fitness plan to promote functional independence throughout the remainder of life.
  • analyze how nutrition plays a part in overall health and aging.
  • compare and contrast different self and group motivational techniques for staying active.
  • identify and respond to life-threatening conditions (including breathing emergencies, cardiac emergencies, and severe bleeding).
  • evaluate physical activities relative to risk factors.
  • design and lead a group exercise activity, and provide modifications and variations to exercises when necessary.
  • identify basic principles of body mechanics and posture.
  • design an individualized exercise prescription program that includes muscular strength and muscular endurance development.
  • explain normal aging-related changes and analyze how lifestyle choices influence the aging process.
  • demonstrate techniques for validating and encouraging older adults during fitness activities.

Career Information

The Senior Fitness Specialist program is ideal for anyone seeking an entry-level position as a fitness leader in community, recreation, and senior centers, health clubs, retirement and assisted living communities, and other sites that cater to seniors.

Certificates

Activity Leader, Coordinator, and Director Training Certificate

This program prepares students for the duties, roles, and responsibilities of planning and leading activities for older people and adults with disabilities residing in skilled nursing facilities (SNFs), adult day health centers (ADHCs), residential care facilities for the elderly (RCFEs), adult day programs (ADPs), and in settings without mandated training requirements, such as senior centers, community and recreations centers, and health clubs where these groups participate in programs and exercise.

This program meets the California Title 22, Divisions 5 requirements for the training of activity leaders working in medical settings, SNFs and ADHCs. An Occupational Therapist and a Certified Therapeutic Recreational Specialist licensed in CA provide 54 hours of instruction, which exceeds the 36 hour Title 22 requirement. The curriculum includes all the required topics for medical settings with supplemental topics related to emergency preparedness, infection control, and other emerging concerns in all settings. The training exceeds Title 22, Division 5 requirements for activity coordinators, and Title 22, Division 6 requirements for activity directors and activity staff with other titles working in non-medical settings, RCFEs and ADPs.

Instructor qualifications and licenses, and the course curriculum are reviewed for approval by the California Department of Public Health (CDPH) each semester. Upon completion of this program, students receive a certificate confirming completion of a training program that meets the State of California SNF and ADHC survey documentation requirements.

Catalog Date: June 1, 2021

Certificate Requirements

Course Code Course Title Units
GERON 200 Activity Leader, Coordinator, and Director Training 3
Total Units: 3

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this program, the student will be able to:

  • evaluate the role of the Activity Leader as it relates to the needs of residents.
  • list important federal and state regulations (CA Title 22).
  • compare and contrast person-centered interaction strategies, their application, and outcomes.
  • identify strategies for effective interactions with residents who have communication deficits and/or dementia behaviors during activities.
  • prepare documentation that complies with federal and state regulations.
  • assess the activity needs of a skilled nursing facility resident and include consideration of their physical and cognitive abilities and their emotional, social, and cultural needs.
  • develop an appropriate activity to meet the physical and cognitive abilities and emotional, social, and cultural needs of a long-term care resident.
  • create an activity calendar and newsletter that meets the overall needs of residents in a facility.

Career Information

This program is specifically designed to meet the rigorous state requirements for preparing activity leaders for employment in a skilled nursing facility and activity coordinators for employment in an adult day health center (as described in and required by California Title 22, Division 5 and 6, respectively). It also meets or exceeds training requirements for similar positions in other settings by other titles (as described in Title 22 Division 6 for nonmedical residential care facilities for the elderly and adult day programs) and in unregulated positions leading activities in senior centers, community and recreation centers, and health clubs.


RCFE Administrator Training Certificate

This program prepares students for the duties, roles, and responsibilities of administrators working in a residential care facility for the elderly (RCFE). These non-medical assisted living and board and care residences are required to have at least one currently Certified Administrator. To become certified requires passing the state Administrator Exam and other requirements. Prior to applying to take the Administrator Exam, applicants must successfully complete a state approved Initial Certification Training Program (ICTP). After completing the ICTP, they have 60 days to pass the exam. This course is an approved ICTP.
Every two years this program is reviewed by the California Department of Social Services (CDSS) for approval as an ICTP to confirm all the required curriculum and all the current state and federal laws and regulations are included. Upon successful completion of this course, students receive a certificate of completion from the Gerontology department confirming their completion of this approved ICTP. The certificate of completion is submitted with their application to take the state Administrator Exam.

Catalog Date: June 1, 2021

Certificate Requirements

Course Code Course Title Units
GERON 220 RCFE Administrator Training 4.5
Total Units: 4.5

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this program, the student will be able to:

  • research the 13 core areas of the RCFE Knowledge Training Standard set forth by the California Department of Social Services (CDSS).
  • analyze the 13 core areas of the RCFE Knowledge Training Standard set forth by the California Department of Social Services (CDSS).
  • discuss the 13 core areas of the RCFE Knowledge Training Standard set forth by the California Department of Social Services (CDSS).
  • generalize the 13 core areas of the RCFE Knowledge Training Standard set forth by the California Department of Social Services (CDSS).
  • enumerate the 13 core areas of the RCFE Knowledge Training Standard set forth by the California Department of Social Services (CDSS).
  • demonstrate knowledge in the 13 core areas of the RCFE Knowledge Training Standard set forth by the California Department of Social Services (CDSS).

Career Information

Passing the state Administrator Exam and becoming a Certified Administrator qualifies students for the position of Administrator of a residential care facility for the elderly (RCFE). Being certified also enhances qualifications for other administrative staff positions within an RCFE and administrative staff are often encouraged to become certified to earn a raise in their pay-scale and increase their upward mobility within the organization. See the program description for details about the course approval by the California Department of Social Services.


Social Service Designee Certificate

The Social Services Designee certificate provides a comprehensive overview of the role and duties of a social services designee in a long-term care facility.

Catalog Date: June 1, 2021

Certificate Requirements

Course Code Course Title Units
GERON 310 Social Service Designee: Role and Responsibility 2.5
GERON 311 Social Services Designee: Legal Issues and End-of-Life Decisions 1
GERON 312 Social Services Designee: Fieldwork 1
Total Units: 4.5

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this program, the student will be able to:

  • Articulate the role and responsibilities of the social services designee in a long-term care facility
  • Analyze normal age changes and their impact on residents
  • Incorporate resident rights and responsibilities into daily practice
  • Apply Omnibus Budget Reconcilliation Act (OBRA)/Title 22 (State of California Department of Social Services) regulations to work environment
  • Evaluate legal and ethical issues relating to powers of attorney, long-term care financing, and end-of-life decisions
  • Evaluate long-term care facility environments
  • Interview and assess long-term care residents to assure needs are being met

Career Information

Social Services Designee in long-term care, assisted living, and retirement facilities